Exclusive: Fresh Fact Revealed On Poly Ibadan Football Clash

FOLLOWING the erupted violence in which the sports director of the National Association of Polytechnic Engineering Students (NAPES), the Ibadan Polytechnic Chapter, Tobi Oyeniyi was stabbed in the head after a football match, new fact has been revealed.
It would be recalled that all Students’ Union Government (SUG), activities within the campus were suspended by the management of The Polytechnic Ibadan through its Registrar , Modupe Fawale after the fracas that erupted between the students in the Faculty of Engineering ( FENG) and their counterparts in other Faculty of Business and Communications Studies (FBCS).
It also asked students to proceed on a forced break.
It would also be recalled that the sports director of the National Association of Polytechnic Engineering Students (NAPES), the Ibadan Polytechnic Chapter, Tobi Oyeniyi during the annual inter-faculty football competition which was held at the Sport Pavilion, North Campus of the institution was stabbed in the head while some students sustained severe injuries and school properties were also damaged.
The incident, as reliably gathered, took place after the Faculty of Engineering (FENG) Queens lost a football match to their colleagues in the faculty of Business and Communications Studies (FBCS) Queens.
Corroborating the Registrar, the institution’s spokesperson, Soladoye Adewole, averred that the suspension became necessary in order to forestall breakdown of peace in the institution.
Few days after the suspension of the institution’s social and academic activities, news continue to filter in regarding the clash which was nebulously attributed to the football match, believing that the stabbing of NAPES’s Sport Director, Tobi led to the intense riot, but Mega Icon Magazineinvestigations revealed that there is more to the clash.
Mega Icon Magazine checks traced the cause of the clash to ‘POWER TUSSLE’  between the Southerners and Northerners, and also struggle for supremacy among some suspected rival gangs in the campus.
Interestingly, students of The Polytechnic Ibadan are of two recognised blocs, housed by the same campus, namely : the North and the South. These were named because of their respective locations.
Basically, the South  comprises the Engineering students and the North accommodates other students from the rest of the  faculties.
The South campus, as learnt, didn’t have a known meaning attached to its name until late 2014, when a sect of the alien infiltrated the region and reinstate their existence, and since the security of the institution was not conscious, their invasion was a successful norm and perhaps birthed the chant and slogan of “Southerners; Awooh.”
With the Slogan of Southerners, the Northerners were intimidated, hence the need for the North Campus slogan “No Shaking” launched few years ago.
Of course for anybody or student who is familiar with the campus terrain understands that “No Shaking” is the popular slogan in the North Campus of the institution.
 According to an highly impeccable source  who confided in our reporter, a secret cult gang – the black axe, popularly known as Aiye Confraternity’ controls  the South campus, while other secret cult organizations; particularly the ‘Eiye Confraternity’ (Air Lords) is ‘running the show’ in the North Campus of the Polytechnic Ibadan.
 
“Sadly, the school management is aware of this development”, he added.
Mega Icon Magazine source further unearthed, “as dominance runs in the system of every confraternity, the two cult gangs (Eiye and Aiye)  hold their ‘base’  in high esteem, thus the hosting of the Students’ Union Government (SUG) activities in any of the ‘base’ (North or South Campus) now provides an avenue for the  cult gangs to strike. That was exactly what transpired during the last football match”.
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