Connect with us

Education

Brexit upheaval brings opportunity for African educators

Published

on

The influential magazine Foreign Policy published an article at the end of 2018 entitled

The Brexit Fueled Death of the British University 

A grim outlook for the British education sector at the start of the year has only got worse as the nation prepares for a “No Deal Brexit” and a long period of uncertainty around UK trade and immigration policies.

A joint letter sent by the heads of 150 UK universities to British Members of Parliament called a No Deal Brexit one of the “biggest threats ever” to British universities. The letter stated “vital research links will be compromised, from new cancer treatments to technologies combating climate change. The valuable exchange of students, staff and knowledge would be seriously damaged.”

British universities are now warning that international students, worth £26bn to the UK economy, will opt for countries such as the US, Canada and Australia instead. Already Australia has moved ahead of the UK as the second biggest destination for overseas students.

However, in a time of crisis for UK universities, opportunities could open up for African higher education institutions. While political developments like Brexit are putting up increased barriers to free global movement, the demand for international education and experience has never been higher.

A British Education in Africa

Since 2002 Rushmore Business School in Mauritius has offered British education in association with British universities from its base in Mauritius. The idea of a winning a British degree without the high cost of relocating and living in the UK proved popular with Mauritian students. Rushmore now offers over 60 programmes in collaboration with UK institutions, some up to PhD level.

ALSO READ  Ajimobi approves N2bn for renovation, rehabilitation of 100 schools

In an interview with AfricaLive.net

 

Dr Essoo announced plans to open new international Rushmore campus in East Africa and Europe.

Both moves would represent a significant reversal of the current trend in Mauritian education of attempting to build the country as an education hub and attract students from Africa and India to study on the island.

Future of Pan-African Education

A Mauritian higher education institution moving into East Africa could be a significant moment in the development of Pan-African internationalist education.

Dr Essoo outlined Rushmore’s development strategy by stating “We were the first institution to really look at this idea of the education hub, of developing Mauritius as a knowledge hub. The previous government started the education hub programme and this government has continued.

However, having looked at it we realised that we are maybe putting the cart before the horse. My personal opinion is that we have tried this education hub approach and it hasn’t worked very well. We attracted maybe 10 to 15% of our students from Africa and India.

I think our next step needs to be going physically to those markets and expanding there. We are working on that now, we call this the third stage of our development. The first stage was setting up initially, the second stage was building our campus here and consolidating what we had, and now the third stage is to go in to other markets and take our model there.

The plan is to have campuses in Mauritius, Eastern Africa, and Europe offering the same courses and offer students mobility between the three campuses. Students from Europe could spend some time in Africa and some time in Mauritius, and see three different cultures. We would then be a truly international school or University and students would get a truly international education.

In addition to Africa, a lot of Europeans, particularly from eastern Europe, study in the UK either for their full degree or for one term or one year through exchange programmes such as Erasmus.

We believe that with Brexit there is going to be an impact on education and on those students. We believe that we can go into those European markets and offer British education.”

The developments at Rushmore highlight the rapid changes the international education market is going through.

ALSO READ  COVID-19: Adamawa threatens to shutdown schools for reopening without approval

Demand for international education has never been higher. However, the traditional education markets in the global north are fostering political environments increasingly hostile to internationalisation.

International higher education is now a $1.9 trillion global market and enrollments in higher education institutions are projected to grow by 200% by 2040. Total enrolment across the African continent will roughly triple from 7.4 million students to nearly 22 million by 2040.

Following the historic launch of the African Continental Free Trade Area

 

The continent must develop leaders with both a Pan-African and internationalist mindset. The expansion of institutions such as Rushmore Business School will be a significant catalyst in created an integrated African higher education sector able to attract partnerships with the leading British and international academics and teachers.

Rushmore Business School offers a wide range of programmes that address Africa’s future development needs, from engineering, business, hospitality and tourism through to aviation.

Comments

Education

Ibadan Poly sacks chief lecturer over alleged sexual misconduct

Published

on

The management of The Polytechnic, Ibadan last Tuesday terminated the appointment of Mr. Ajadi Kelani Ojo Omotosho, a lecturer in the department of Urban and Regional Planning in the institution.

 

According to a statement signed by the institution’s Registrar/Secretary to the Council, Fawale M.T and made available to Mega Icon Magazine, the lecturer was shown the way out of the citadel of learning for his involvement in act of misconduct which resulted in “embarrassing and tarnishing the image” of The Polytechnic, Ibadan , his employer.

 

The letter of termination dated 15th September, 2020 , signed by Fawale M.T, the Registrar read, “You will recall that you were engaged in an inappropriate behavior and a poorly managed relationship with your former student. These resulted in embarrassing and tarnishing the image of your employer, The Polytechnic, Ibadan.

 

“You will also recall your responses and appearances before the investigation panel and senior staff disciplinary committee that looked into the above matters. After a careful consideration of the issues above, the Governing Council found you guilty as your actions and activities amount to misconduct.

 

“The Governing Council, therefore approved the immediate termination on your appointment with effect from Friday , 11th September,2020. “You are to handover all properties of the institution in your possession to your Head of Department”, the letter concluded.

ALSO READ  OPINION: Last Note On ₦3000 Education Development Levy | By Fasasi Adekunle

Continue Reading

Education

‘Many of my classmates called me daddy and taught me law’ – Adeolu Akande

Published

on

completed law programme after four attempts

 

 

I wasn’t the oldest in the class. I think there were at least three persons in the Abuja Campus of the Law School who were above 70 years of age. I, however, belonged to a generation of students called “the Elders,” most of us in our 50s and 60s. I was inspired by many of the older gentlemen, especially those who had been Senators, Members of the House of Representatives, Permanent Secretaries, Ambassadors, and successful professionals – Accountants, Doctors, Engineers, Actors, Journalists, etc. It was an irony that each time some of my younger classmates told me I inspired them, coming to the Law School at my age, I, in turn, took my inspiration from those above 70 and successful men who were in the same class.

My interest in Law was spurred by my interest in politics and the fact that many of the personalities that inspired my interest in politics like Chief Obafemi Awolowo, Chief Samuel Ladoke Akintola, Chief Bode Thomas were lawyers. My interest in Law deepened when I had opportunities to work in government (Federal and State), and from there, I concluded that knowledge of Law is a sine qua non for outstanding performance in government. As Chief of Staff to Governor Abiola Ajimobi, there were occasions when we had heated debates on issues. The governor would agree with my position but would end up accepting the counsel of the lawyers in the cabinet. His reasoning was always that if he followed my advice and there was a backlash, he would be left vulnerable. However, he could still take refuge in the fact that he followed the counsel of his lawyers, especially on matters bordering on legal issues. When the governor dissolved the cabinet in 2013, I resolved to go back to school and Igbinedion University, Okada, Edo State offered me a serene, stimulating and comfortable environment to pursue my dream.

ALSO READ  UI launches book on employment, entrepreneurship  

It was both challenging and fun attending classes with younger classmates. Many of them called me daddy, and I often found that amusing. Many of them were also quite helpful. I believe this new generation is smarter. They grasp issues much faster, and they are quicker to adapt. They have access to more information and can sustain discussions across many disciplines, having no boundaries between what the older generations classify as “serious” and “unserious”. For instance, they don’t regard versatility in music as a sign of unseriousness. I encountered many of the best students in the class who were nimble dancers and almost fanatical football fans, especially the English Premier League.

Midway into the session, I was astonished when they discussed issues of Law, and I began wondering whether we were in the same class! This inspired me, or more accurately, pressured me to work harder.

Many of them taught me the mathematics aspect of Law, particularly in Corporate Law and Property Law. Believe me, it is helpful when people who are younger than you teach you a subject. You feel challenged to work harder, especially when the one teaching you does not have the patience to repeat himself. One of them once told me, “Daddy, this thing is not as difficult as you make it look! I was slightly jolted, but I calmed down and jokingly told him to take it easy with daddy!

ALSO READ  African Green Revolution Forum 2019: AfDB, partners relaunch agriculture platform

..I SUCCEEDED AFTER FOUR ATTEMPTS.

I feel fulfilled because I finally succeeded in finishing the law programme after four attempts. I had to withdraw after one year at the University of Ibadan because some of my colleagues wrote a petition that I was a full-time staff of the Nigerian Tribune, so I had no business enrolling for a full-time law programme. I would have finished in 2001. I tried a second time to run the programme in 2010 at Buckingham University in the United Kingdom, but family commitments made me abort the trip a few days to my departure. I did one year with the University of London External Degree programme in 2014 but opted out when it looked like the Council of Legal Education would not shift ground on not allowing correspondence students to attend the Nigerian Law School. I felt there was no point reading law if you would not appear as counsel in court.

Law School is tough. You work round the clock. You must achieve 75 percent class attendance. You must attend group meetings and complete the daily assignments. You must be well prepared for every class as you may be called to anwer questions in class and you will not want to disgrace yourself before more than a thousand classmates amongst who call you daddy. Failing the bar examination was no option. In truth, it crossed my mind a number of occasions that it was quite possible to flunk the final bar examination. I always shrugged it off and wished it away, but felt pressured to work harder. The only reward for hard work is more work, and I am glad it has ended in praise.

ALSO READ  COVID-19: Adamawa threatens to shutdown schools for reopening without approval

To God be the glory.

 

Professor Adeolu Akande is a Professor of Political Science and Public Administration.He chairs the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC)

Continue Reading

Education

COVID-19: Adamawa threatens to shutdown schools for reopening without approval

Published

on

By

 

The Adamawa State Government on Tuesday threatened to shut down primary schools in the state for reopening without approval.

The state Commissioner for Education, Wilbina Jackson, made this known during a meeting with the state chapter of the National Association of Proprietors of Private Schools in Yola.

Jackson emphasized that the COVID-19 guidelines must be followed by all stakeholders to prevent the spread of the virus in the state.

According to her, “The National Policy on education did not state that primary six should write Common Entrance, that is what we explained to them.

“It is all about automatic promotion, no one is demoted. So that is not an excuse as far as we are concerned. We are here to obey guidelines according to the Federal Ministry of Education on COVID-19″.

The Commissioner further explained that the government has not approved the reopening of primary schools nor the conduct of common entrance examinations in the state.

She condemned the situation where officials sent by the ministry to monitor compliance of schools in line with the COVID-19 guidelines were prevented from doing so.

ALSO READ  El-rufai's Education Policy And The NLC's Resistance
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Tweets by ‎@megaiconmagg

Subscribe to our Newsletter

* indicates required

MegaIcon Magazine Facebook Page

Advertisement

MEGAICON TV

Trending

%d bloggers like this: